The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Latest Posts — Fieldnotes

Previous 25 | Showing 26-50 of 16,487 fieldnotes. Most recent first | Next 25

Eyam Moor Barrow (Cairn(s))

The barrow is a mess, the shape all but gone, straggling and ragged at the edges. But there’s still a lot of stone here, indicating that the upheaval wasn’t about robbing for walls. And the setting is perfect, better than the circle itself as it’s that bit closer to the northern lip of the moor. The countryside drops to a patchwork of green fields in the Derwent valley, with Hathersage the obvious settlement below. Beyond and above, the hills rise again towards the high uplands above Edale, the moors of South Yorkshire and the edges around Higger Tor.

Our rainbow makes its last appearance of the day, a welcome splash of colour against the grey. I should have come here years ago, but it’s still a sweet pleasure to come now.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
27th November 2016ce

Wet Withens (Stone Circle)

As the sun starts to come out, it picks out a light grey amongst the browns and reds, revealing the presence of the mutilated cairn next to Wet Withins. With that fixed, the eye then finds the darkly curving bank of the stone circle itself, with one larger stone standing out at its edge.

Wet Withens is another Peaks site that has lived in my mind and on my imaginary list for a long time. A feature in Burl’s guide, apart from the one swiftly abandoned attempt so long ago it’s eluded me up until now.

Rather like Gibbet Moor yesterday, some of the joy of coming here is undoubtedly borne from relief and satisfaction at actually getting here. But as well as that, it’s a terrific site. Bigger than I expected, the clearly defined bank and neatly placed stones make it a wonderful example of the ubiquitous Peak District embanked stone circle. Add to that the colours of the moor, freshly scrubbed from the recent soaking and illuminated by the sun against the dark backdrop of billowing clouds, and we’ve got a bit of a classic going on.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
27th November 2016ce

Stanage (Cup Marked Stone)

Where the ground once again levels off, Stanage cairn sits to the east of the path, surrounded by heather but prominent enough to stand clear of it. It’s a flat-topped mound at least 15 metres across, with a rubble bank poking through the vegetation on its circumference. It enjoys a great view to the north, with Mam Tor just peaking over Abney Moor. The most striking landscape feature from here is Win Hill, which reminds me of the Sugarloaf/Pen y Fal in South Wales. A good cairn in a lovely spot, but the real gem here is the cup marked stone in the edge of the monument.

I’ve been aware of this stone for the best part of two decades, simply because I bought a postcard of it in Bakewell bookshop a long time ago. Somehow I’ve never quite found the time to get here until now, but it’s even better in the flesh. The cupmarks are large and cover two sides of the stone, as well as its top. We stop here for a while, watching the wind push the rain clouds of earlier further east, before revealing one last gift, an incomplete rainbow hanging beautifully over Win Hill. There are moments when time stops and lets you breathe, completely at peace. This is one of those, fleetingly brief but eagerly snatched.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
27th November 2016ce

Rhiw Porthnant (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery)

En route to Folwers Armchair from Caer Caradoc in southern Shropshire a fiddle of small roads must be dithered through, no road went straight there, it was this way and that, up and down, and along, quite suddenly we found ourselves on a lonely road over the hills passing a trio of barrows, we stopped for a look.

Barrows 1, 2 and 3, the first two are on the north side of the road. the western most of the two had sheep and a metal farm related wotsit on top, bit rude, but the barrow is large and the sunlit grass bright. The eastern of the pair is again quite large, but curtailed by the minor road on it's south side.
The lonely barrow on the south side of the road is perhaps the largest, and is also called Dicky's stool, Perhaps he was a giant and he left this little message, a sample, for our bemusement, colour me bemused, and brown.

Like Carl, both Alken and myself commented on the niceness of the place, the low sun shone sporadically on the substantial barrows and distant hill tops.
Very nice, but it's not a stone circle, so we carry on our way.
postman Posted by postman
27th November 2016ce

Caer Caradoc (Hillfort)

There is a high risk of repeating Carl here, word for word, so I will try to dodge words like wonderful, fabulous, and idyllic. But it will not be easy, because he is absolutely spot on.

We parked near Wax Hall west of the fort, blocking an unused gate by the road, then walked to the first foot path leading to the east and passes the fort on it's north side, I think that still left one fence to jump though, maybe.
We entered the fort through the eastern entrance, shades of iron age peasants applauded our arrival, or it might have been a strong wind, which might also have been rather cold.
Neither of us were expecting such deep ditches and high banks, there's at least two Caer Caradoc's in Shropshire, I've been to the other one two or three times, it's not anyway near as good as this one, I really should have been here years ago.
So with a mixture of incredulity and awe upon our faces we followed the lower rampart west on the forts south side. A small Hawthorn tree still bearing bright red berries autumned its way by us as we moved west, Jim of the doors was right the west is the best. Soon enough we arrive at the western entrance, like Carl we were reminded heavily of Maiden Castle, no not that one, the big one. The west gate is a complex of deep ditches running away from the central walkway, high banks in between, it really is quite fab, aah I mean amazing, that was close.
I spotted a pair of shadows following us, so I photoed them, I waved but got no return. Entering the fort through the massively impressive west gate we walked round the interior, passing a shake hole? or abandoned mine shaft or ritual area or hole, yes, it was definitely a hole, and on to look out through the eastern entrance where we first came in. Then it was back to the super entrance and then follow the rampart back east along the northern side. Along this northern rampart we spotted at least three house platforms, I think that's the proper speak, if not, then they were the site of some kind of building, cannily hidden out of the wind. The sun began to come out from it's cloudy hiding place, when it shone upon the trees across the valley illuminating the yellows, browns, and reds of autumn, shining upon the wet grassy fields, it was better than good. Almost said idyllic then.
After walking along the triple set of banks we were back at the eastern entrance, we had performed the obligatory circuit of the fort, the very least a visitor should do at a hill fort. But it was getting later in the day and there is a site with a name that burns a deep hole in my obsessive mind, he has an armchair you know.
postman Posted by postman
27th November 2016ce

Great Hagley (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Much has changed in the last almost fourteen years on the modern antiquarian, people come and people go, theories get aired then discarded, and apparently you used to be able to add a spurious site without any disputed antiquity tag being applied.
Great Hagley is one of those sites.
I've been a TMA'er for quite a while now and during this time I've clicked on just about every site contained therein, including this large standing stone, it immediately went onto my list of places to see, just like the Murder stone and Minninglow. But even though the stone is not marked on any map, and it's not listed on any monument record, here it is parading around like an actual menhir, if it had a disputed antiquity tag I might not have come, indeed it is not very easy to get to either.
And, the fact that there is no granite anywhere near here, throws more doubt into the mix. Ok, a more famous place than this imported lots of stones from some far away place. But would you bother with it for a solitary standing stone?
If it is hard to imagine why ancient man would go so far for a piece of granite then it's even harder to imagine why some one in more modern times would go so far for it. Besides, I find it a touch difficult to believe that mindless rock diligently sticks to geology maps, or that geology maps are 100% infallible.
Marks in it's favour are few, it isn't a scratching post, (if such things exist at all) unless cows round here are as tall as elephants, never saw any cows near here anyway. It's in a good position for a stone like this, with the immaculate Caer Caradoc hill fort across the valley, and many becairned hill tops on the horizon. But maybe that suggests it was put here after the fort was built.
Quite annoying isn't it.

But having had my whine and whinge, it's always good to scratch that itch, it is now crossed off the list, and slowly fading from the obsessive side of my mind. Now it is time to go some where that is definitely, certainly and prominently ancient.
postman Posted by postman
27th November 2016ce

West Benthoul (Cairn(s))

Head almost 100 meters back west from the Easterhill site keeping an eye for two large boulders. These mark the south side of the cairn, to the west there is another kerb still in place. These certainly give the cairn a sense of presence amongst the fallen trees and ferns. No gorse or furze here, what a boost!!

The site sits at 9 metres wide and is over 0.5 metres high. Another nice place in a very pleasant wood on a very pleasant Autumn day.

Visited 8/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th November 2016ce

Easterhill (Cairn(s))

Head south on the B9125, at Garlogie, and take the first road heading south east which conveniently points the way to the Standing Stones Of Echt (Cullerlie). After visiting that keep heading south taking the first farm track east. I asked permission to park at the house nearest the south west tip of the wood.

From here I headed east and jumped the wee wall into the forest heading gently up hill hugging the tree line to the south. About 1/4 mile up head north and the cairn should be seen.

This must have some size of a site but now the cairn sits at over 12 metres wide and is 1 metre high. What might be a possible kerb sits on the south flank whilst luckily the centre of the cairn is also clear and appears to be undisturbed except by the trees growing on it. However today there is a good vibe about this place and to make matters even better the sun shone through the trees to highlight the cairn.

I always wondered why the nearby circle seemed to be all by itself. Now its obvious it had friends nearby.

Visited 8/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th November 2016ce

Cnoc Molach, Badanloch Forest (Stone Row / Alignment)

As with the excellent kerbed cairn of Carn Glas standing, unseen upon its hillside, a half mile or so to the south-east, the motorist traversing the B871 would be unlikely, in the extreme - even if he/she also happened to have assumed membership of that rather idiosyncratic club of Modern Antiquarians - to halt and explore the low ridge of Cnoc Molach... if it wasn't for the extraordinary actions of those, past and present, responsible for annotating our maps with references to 'burnt mounds', 'hut circles', 'field systems' 'cairns' and, perhaps most intriguing of all, 'stone rows'. So thank you Ordnance Survey for helping me to assuage, temporarily at least, this almost amaranthine state of curiosity I appear to possess.

I pull off the road a little north of the Badanloch Burn and, overcoming a momentary hesitation - courtesy of my spiritual guardian John le Mesurier's customary 'Do you think this is wise' admonition (much better than an angel, I find) - I advance westward across the very wet, rough moorland to the low summit of Cnoc Molach, the ubiquitous, tussocky grass here giving way to outcropping rock. The outlook is expansive, the watery aspect maintained, albeit in a much purer, infinitely more attractive form than the soggy, eastern flanks, the extensive contents of Loch Badanloch leading the eye toward a horizon diffused by distant hill tops.. not to mention the occasional mountain summit, too. However stone rows are very much conspicuous by their absence.

Descending to the south-west(ish) I'm still none the wiser until, suddenly, protruding through the peaty surface like (thankfully) misfiring versions of Cadmus's dragon's teeth, there they are. A couple of reasonably sized stones notwithstanding, these monuments - or is it a single monument? - are distinctly underwhelming in physical stature, the layout not at all clear... four, maybe five rows?; indeed one wonders how many more diminutive orthostats still stand subsumed within the moor. If buried stuff can be said to 'stand', that is? I'm left with the impression that this was very much a 'no frills' working landscape, tailored to the specific ritualistic needs of the community which called Cnoc Molach home back in the day. The people who, I assume, lived within the hut circles which still stand overlooking the loch... and tended the surviving field system, buried their VIP(s) within the nearby cairn? Anyhow, according to those wondrous OS people:

[Upon the] "SW-facing moorland slopes of Cnoc Molach within an area of hut circles and field system is a group of at least five incomplete stone rows. They are aligned from NNE to SSW, converging slightly towards the uphill NNE side. A total of twenty eight stones can be identified Visited by OS (N K B) 26 April 1977"

I go walkabout upon Cnoc Molach, noting numerous examples of the aforementioned hut circles and cairns, clearance or otherwise. As I do so, pausing at one particularly large hut circle to reflect - a hall circle, perhaps? - I become acutely aware of the all pervading, almost eerie silence, an overwhelming sense, perhaps, of 'what went before' irresistibly seeping into the present? Hey, maybe this isn't as daft as it sounds... is it possible that placing yourself in such positions may retrieve or trigger memes (for want of a better word) buried deep within the shared human consciousness? Guess Richard Dawkins might have a view on that.

The former community of Cnoc Molach, therefore, is not somewhere to come to be blown away by awesome feats of human constructive endurance, to see exquisitely shaped monoliths defining a pioneering culture. In my opinion it transcends all that, great as all that may be, instead perhaps offering an opportunity to be a little more self-indulgent. A suitable environment, the 'space' to ponder who we are vis-à-vis who we used to be?
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
26th November 2016ce
Edited 27th November 2016ce

Castle Ditches (Bedstone) (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

This east west aligned late Iron age settlement is a rectangle with slightly rounded corners, in a green grassy field on a slight ridge, sitting as it does, above Ferny Dingle and Darky Dale. Not much reason to come all this way for, indeed, we only stopped because we were passing. postman Posted by postman
25th November 2016ce

Leys of Marlee (Stone Circle)

Who would have thought that a six-stone ring bisected by a road could possess such an aura? Driving through it to park in the nearby driveway to whatever facility that is I wasn't at all sure about it but then walking back along the road for a closer look I just thought 'Wow!' It probably helped that the stones and surrounding ground, trees and foliage were all encrusted with frost lending the whole site a wonderful silvery sheen but even so this re-jigged ring has atmosphere in abundance. Yes, the traffic races through it but it's hardly a steady stream and somehow you just stop noticing the cars and vans, taking care of course not to linger in the middle when something's approaching. Being so easy to find and requiring so little effort this is definitely one not to be missed if you're in the vicinity. ironstone Posted by ironstone
25th November 2016ce

Lundin Farm (Stone Circle)

You know that slight sense of disappointment when you arrive at a site and it doesn't look quite like it does in all the photos you've seen? Well, I got that here where the mound is a lot more overgrown than I expected and the two smaller stones in particular consequently somewhat obscured by shrubbery making photography difficult from some angles. But then..... I looked at it afresh, bathed as it was in beautiful golden late-afternoon autumnal sunshine (where I'd been racing to arrive before the sun dipped below the horizon) and saw it for what it is, a unique setting with that tree sprouting in the middle, enough leaves still on the branches to enhance the picture, especially with the backdrop of the frost-covered landscape, the temperature having failed to climb above -2 all day. Disappointment swiftly changed to enchantment and I sat for 15/20 minutes lapping it up until the sun slipped behind the hills and it suddenly started feeling very cold. ironstone Posted by ironstone
25th November 2016ce

Hob Hurst's House (Burial Chamber)

We came to Hob Hurst’s House on our second Peak District holiday, pretty much exactly 18 years ago to the day. I remember a walk through the woods above Chatsworth, then crossing a boggy and wet moor under increasingly heavy rain. We were ill-dressed for open November moorland in the rain, and our first visit to a chambered tomb left both of us soggy and underwhelmed.

Since then we’ve been to a lot more prehistoric sites, and I’ve wanted to return here for ages. Funny how your memory is both accurate in details and completely faulty in the broader picture. As soon as we get here, I instantly remember the shape, size and layout of the mound with its squared-off bank and ditch. But I don’t recall the exposed stones of the chamber at all. I also have a recollection of a fairly flat landscape, perhaps the rain and cloud condensed the world around us that day. Today the views to the south are extensive and sweeping, taking in the deep valley of Beeley Brook, with the sharp line of Harland Edge above, then onwards to rising ridges and long hillsides fading into grey. The unmistakeable feature on the skyline is Minninglow, for all that I’ve never been there. For the second time today Stubob’s presence in these hills is palpable. Eyup Stu.

We stop here for a while and have a proper look at the chamber, noticing that the mound itself appears to be built at least partly of stone, another thing missed the first time. It’s too damp to sit and my wet feet are beginning to make me cold, and in any case there’s one more reacquaintance to be made today, so we head off downhill, following the line of the wood until we reach a field boundary.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
23rd November 2016ce

Gibbet Moor North (Stone Circle)

Gibbet Moor is access land, and we make our way uphill, along a sturdy track running southwest from where the road crosses Umberley Brook. TMA shows all sorts of sites up here, but I only have eyes for the stone circle, three stones remaining of what might be a rare non-Scottish example of a “four poster”.

I know the circle is somewhere about 500m to the southeast of the point where the track meets a drystone wall. From here the tussocky, reedy grass and patches of heather look decidedly unappealing and lacking in paths, but this is where we need to go. Setting off into the slight unknown, the vegetation isn’t as bad as it looked, low enough to step through without snagging ankles and feet. But it is wet, and within 20 yards of leaving the track my feet are soaked in my old boots. Nice.

We wander around the gently sloping hillside looking for small stones in every reed clump and heather swell. There are plenty of stones, little stones, bigger stones, outcrops and individual rocks. But nothing resembling three stones of a circle. At one point I head towards an odd looking line of upright pallets, but nothing leaps out from the grasses.

We’ve been going around in circles for about 40 minutes before I finally decide to look properly at the photos on TMA. The first couple are by Stubob, one showing the recognisable dark swell of East Moor, the next looking north across the valley towards a distinctive clump of trees on the opposite hillside. The conditions are different to our dull grey skies and distant snow, but the landmarks are unchanged. Getting to a position where both photos match the view from where we are involves heading into a particularly soggy patch of reedy grass, close to one of the pallets I noticed earlier. And suddenly, there they are: three stones, unmistakeably slim and upright, their heads barely poking above grasses. Without Stu’s photos we’d probably still be there now, so much gratitude is due to the Peaks pioneer.

The lengthening grasses are threatening to drag the stones under, appearing quite a bit taller than in the previous photos. But despite the soggy setting and the even soggier feet, despite the small size of the stones and the absence of a fourth stone, I really like this site. Perhaps it’s partly the sense of relief and satisfaction at actually finding the circle, but it has a lot of charm. The views to the northwest and north are fine, across the valley and out to the distant edges. At this time of year the reedy grasses are a lovely shade of orange, which sadly the recalcitrant sun fails to properly light while we’re here. The stones are well chosen, shapely and lightly tapering. Whether this ever was a four stone circle, or just a three stone setting, I guess we’ll never know. But it’s well worth a visit, just wear something waterproof on your feet.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
23rd November 2016ce

Park Gate Stone Circle

Park Gate stone circle is not visible from the track, so it’s a matter of following the route until it starts to turn northwest, where another fainter path heads off north onto the moor again. There are a couple of stones in the circle that are big enough to stand above the reedy grasses, so it’s a lot easier to see than Gibbet Moor was earlier.

This is the second revisit of the day, as we came here in 1998 on the same day as Hob Hurst’s House. At the time it was the fourth stone circle I’d been to, after Arbor Low, Nine Ladies and Nine Stones Close, three of the Peak District’s big hitters. So it’s probably not a great surprise that it felt a bit of a disappointment after those sites. Although there are at least ten stones in the circle, many of them are small and overwhelmed by the tufty, reedy grass that surrounds the site. The biggest stone, on the southwest of the circle, is leaning at an alarming angle over the top of a pit that threatens to swallow it whole if it ever goes the rest of the way. The most striking stone is the one on the east, a shapely upright with what appears to be at least one cupmark and some other dents that are apparently bullet holes and do have a ragged outline. This is the stone I remember from our first visit, and indeed the only one that I have a photo of.

For all that, it’s actually a really good circle. In the 18 years since I last came, I’ve been to a lot of wrecked, dishevelled, uncared for, ploughed out, vandalised and generally unloved sites. So although there’s also been a lot of awe-inspiring, stop-you–dead-at-50 paces classics over the same period, my expectations are very different to how they were back then. Now, I see a fine circle in a good setting, looking towards Harland Edge particularly. It could do with a de-vegging, as the long grass is detracting from the sense of the whole site. Circle stones needn’t be enormous to make an impression, as anyone who’s had the pleasure of Cerrig Duon or Nant Tarw could attest. But they do need to be kept visible, and a judicious tidy up here would do it wonders.

The only disappointment really is the terrible dullness of the day. It’s not even 2:30 but it feels like dusk, as though the sun has given up and set early, leaving a crepuscular greyness to the scene, even with the autumn colours of the moor. We head back to the track and head west.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
23rd November 2016ce

Beeley Moor (Ring Cairn)

The final site of the day is Beeley Moor ring cairn, an easy visit as it’s right next to the track. So near in fact that the track is slowly nibbling away at its northern arc. The monument itself is quite heavily overgrown with heather and scrubby grass on the circumference and bracken in the centre. Stones protrude from the bank here and there. It’s reasonably upstanding, but worth a stop off mainly for the excellent views down to the valley below. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
23rd November 2016ce

Oldman Hill (Cairn(s))

The Oldman Hill cairn has received a fair bashing in its time from agriculture. It is situated on top of the wee hill due east of the B979 and to the south west of the Kirkton Of Maryculter. I parked at the house to the south of the Maryculter junction crossed the road to the farm track, walked a hundred metres, jumped the first gate to the south then headed uphill and south east.

The cairn is situated in a wonderful location with lovely all round views to Bennachie, Peterculter and west towards Morven. Also just in view are the masts on Brimmond Hill. The cairn is bout 8 metres wide and 0.5 metres tall. There are decent earthfast kerbs on the southside.

Luckily the vegetation hasn't completely taken over. The main danger underfoot being the droppings of cows.

Visited 8/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd November 2016ce

Pressendye (Cairn(s))

19/11/2016 - It's a funny old hill Pressendye. A decent size (just over 2000ft) but it can be easily overlooked, sandwiched between lovely small hills like Bennachie to the east and wonderful Morven and the big hills in the Cairngorms to the west.

The usual approach is from the Tarland side, south of the hill but today we thought we'd try from the north for a change.

Cold start to the day. Car said minus 5 as we parked not long after sunrise at the beginning of the track into Loanend Plantation (NJ 5112 1276). The track goes west through trees. After curving round Beadshallock Hill it gets a bit vague but nothing too bad and then becomes more distinct again up Scar Hill. From here the view of the landscape opens up as the track heads across The Socach to the top of Pressendye.

I love this top and the cairn is nice. We sat down for a sandwich and brew alongside it. The ground was a little chilly to be honest but still the rest felt good. Very peaceful place and the frost on the heather looked lovely in the low November sunlight.

I guess like most upland cairns the walk there is as important as the cairn itself and luckily the way up is good for this one. Got me thinking as we walked, about the folk who had travelled this hill before me to place this cairn in such a nice location. A fine day again on Pressendye.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st November 2016ce

Lord Arthur's Hill (Cairn(s))

12/11/2016 - Posting really just to give a different route up than Drew's. It's no better or worse but more options are always good, access wise.

We parked opposite the lovely church at Tullynessle, east of the hill. It's a nice walk west along a tarmac road to Terpersie. As the road splits at NJ 5482 2007 (good parking here too and close to Corrie cairn stone circle as well) we turned left to cross the Esset Burn and followed the track past Dubston. From here it's just a case of keeping to the track as it climbs Fouchie Shank (hut circle half way up) to the top of Lord Arthur's Hill. For a longer walk, cross the burn just before the start of Fouchie Shank and head north along the old right of way past the disused quarry for a long loop round the Correen Hills to the Lord Arthur's Hill.

The cairn is just east of the trigpoint. A modern shelter has been built on top but the cairn footprint is still visible. The top is lovely. Great views all round from Bennachie to the east and west to the Cairngorms. The Correen Hills are usually a quiet place to visit and you would normally have the cairn to yourself. It's a lovely spot to sit and while away a few hours.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st November 2016ce

Quarry Wood (Henge)

We parked at the car park on Brumley Brae, to the west of Elgin, opposite the southern end of Hamilton Drive. From there we followed a maze of paths in a south westerly direction. We entered the 40 + metres wide inner/50 + metres outer henge from the eastern side. Similar type entrances occur to the west, north (which has the notice board) and south. Various stones might mark entrances, or remnants of circles or are just flukily placed stones. I'd like to think they were circles once upon a time situated within the henge. With all the forestry work I guess we will never know. Quarrying has removed some of the henge further adding to the damage. However it now seems to site is being looked after as they found a 'curved bank' in the north.

People from Elgin still refer to this as the Danish Camp and they certainly know how to look after the paths. It would be nice to think the archaeos would look after the henge. At least the site is now clear of trees hopefully they might get round to clearing the site of vegetation.

Visited 5/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th November 2016ce

Findrassie (Cairn(s))

Unlike the nearby kerb cairn this is a hard site to spot in a forest with a golden leave floor. As Canmore suggests trees are growing in the middle of the 8 meter site. Underneath the moss and leaves the remnants of cairn material are a trip hazard. The height of the cairn is no more than 0.5 metres.

Leave Elgin on the B9012, north west, and head east at the first crossroads. Pull in immediately after the pillars on the west side. Walk in a north westerly direction and the cairn will be soon be seen.

Autumn definitely adds a positive vibe to these places, especially on a sunny day with all the colours on display.

Visited 5/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th November 2016ce

Knappach East (Cairn(s))

Knappach East has taken a severe battering having been trenched and basically had its cairn material scattered about. Today the trench had been filled by the Autumn leaves and looked very pretty with its autumnal makeover.

The site sits at around 10 metres wide and reaches about 0.5 metres in height. Its near neighbours to the west have fared better despite the forestry works. From The Knappach walk in a north easterly direction.

Time to head west to Maryfield in the light rain.

Visited 3/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th November 2016ce

Crammag Head (Stone Fort / Dun)

A return a year after my first visit, and I found that the replacement of the power line and the poles that carry it has caused fresh damage to the cliff to cliff earthwork that encloses the dun, which is believed may be an earlier structure. See photo. When the light was replaced a few years ago there was a watching brief on the work. Sadly, times seem to have changed.. spencer Posted by spencer
13th November 2016ce

Tree Island, Whitefield Loch (Crannog)

This site is no longer an island due to a fall in the level of the loch. It is unmarked on OS 82, but delineated by a cairn symbol on Explorer 310 on account of the spread of stone atop it. Access is from the fisherman's car park at NX 235 549, from whence paths radiate, then beating your way through the brush. Canmore ID 62149 spencer Posted by spencer
13th November 2016ce

Knappach West (Cairn(s))

A short distance west and the second large cairn can be seen. This cairn is slightly larger than its near neighbour standing at over 10 metres wide and 1 metre tall. Cairn material still sits over the top of the cairn which has retained its shape. A slab on the top might suggest a cist cover whilst several kerbs have been scattered. It must also be said that several kerbs remain in place despite the forestation.

This hunt on the south of the River Dee has provided many highlights and this was another site well worth a visit.

Visited 3/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
12th November 2016ce
Previous 25 | Showing 26-50 of 16,487 fieldnotes. Most recent first | Next 25