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Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm) (Broch) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm)</b>Posted by wideford wideford Posted by wideford
12th February 2017ce

Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm) (Broch) — Fieldnotes

North of Harray Community Hall is the Netherbrough Road. Just past Yeldavale the knowe stands out boldly in the far corner of a field, at this time swamped by bright vegetation vegetation. If only I hadn't already been walking for miles I would have paid a visit despite the blooming plants. It sits on marshy ground thought to have been a lochan. Less than a kilometre further down is another broch, the Knowe of Gullow.From there I went as far as the turn for Ballarat House, where in the field opposite Gullow is what looked like a banked feature which looks equally Iron Age but must be modern as it is not noted anywhere. Burrian's underground structure brings to my mind two Orcadian sites, one where a broch was built over a tomb and another where the supposed broch was purely ceremonial/ritual wideford Posted by wideford
12th February 2017ce

Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm) (Broch) — Miscellaneous

The Knowe of Burrian , NMRS record no. HY31NW 2, was once 60' in diameter and 17 high. A berm seperates south and west sides of broch remains 1.2m high on the flattened top of a steep natural hillock. On the east side are three courses of outer wall face and possible traces of the inner wall face, from which it is estimated that its external diameter is ~18.3m and internal 8.5m.
After several failed digs by other folk Robert Flett of Garth made a go of excavating it in 1936, when a trench found distinct layers of 'hearth-materials' - charcoal, pot-boilers, animal bones, etc - before almost at the other side a slight turn revealed an interior chamber floor. As well as the Pictish Symbol Stone he found some burnt wood, stone tools and ashes. Then came one of those myserious 'wells' . Of two excavations in the centre of the mound the more westerly is the now covered location of an underground chamber. From a vertical entrance approx. 2'6" square eleven steps led steeply down 12' to a 10'x5' flat-roofed figure-of-8 corbelled structure compared to the Gurness well then being dug, though the site was called an earth-house rather than a broch at the time.
wideford Posted by wideford
12th February 2017ce

Hangman's Stone, Hampnett (Holed Stone) — Folklore

According to DP Sullivan (Old Stones Of The Cotswolds & Forest Of Dean - 1999 Reardon), this is another of those hangman's stones that takes its name from an idiotic thief:
It obtained its name, apparently, from an incident involving a sheep rustler who, when getting over the stile with his spoils fell and was hung by the entangled sheep. ... It is possible that this stone once marked a gibbet, giving a more plausible reason for its name.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
12th February 2017ce

Pen-y-Beacon (Cist) — Links

Portable Antiquities Scheme (CPAT)


Lovely barbed and tanged arrowhead found on Hay Bluff/Pen y Beacon and recorded and shared by PAS.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
12th February 2017ce

Antas de Herdade do Barrocal (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Antas de Herdade do Barrocal</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Antas de Herdade do Barrocal</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
12th February 2017ce

The Giant's Ring (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>The Giant's Ring</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th February 2017ce

Kilfeaghan (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Kilfeaghan</b>Posted by Rhiannon<b>Kilfeaghan</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th February 2017ce

Leighlinbridge (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Miscellaneous

From inquiries that Canon Willcocks was good enough to get made for me amongst some of the oldest inhabitants of the district, it appears that the pillar-stone was always known as "the Clonegall stone." Gall is an ancient term for a pillar-stone; and "Clonegall," in the present instance, would no doubt signify "pillar-stone meadow."
From Notes on a gallaun, or pillar-stone, at Leighlinbridge, County Carlow' by Sir Edmund T Bewley. In the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland v35, 1905.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th February 2017ce

Leighlinbridge (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Leighlinbridge</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th February 2017ce

Ox Stones (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Ox Stones</b>Posted by spencer spencer Posted by spencer
11th February 2017ce

East Hill (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>East Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>East Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>East Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>East Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
11th February 2017ce

Dolmen Palet de Rolan (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

This dolmen and http://www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/18146/dolmen_roquetraoucade.html are on the same hillside , less than 400m apart , much the same height and have very similar views . The orientation of each differs by 100 degrees . tiompan Posted by tiompan
10th February 2017ce

Dolmen Palet de Rolan (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Dolmen Palet de Rolan</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Dolmen Palet de Rolan</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Dolmen Palet de Rolan</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
10th February 2017ce

East Hill Croft (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>East Hill Croft</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th February 2017ce

Woodtown (Cursus) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

DU025-087----
Class: Cursus
Townland: WOODTOWN
Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes
Description: A U-shaped earthwork is visible on an aerial photograph aligned approximately NW–SE; the curve of the U is at the SE. It is defined by a low bank and external fosse that encloses an area c. 125m by 45m. The precise nature of this earthwork is unknown and the possibility that it could be the remnants of a cursus-type monument cannot be excluded.

Compiled by: Paul Walsh
ryaner Posted by ryaner
10th February 2017ce

Tibradden (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Tibradden</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Tibradden</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Tibradden</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Tibradden</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
10th February 2017ce

Tibradden (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

I've scouted around this area before and always given up due to access issues. We're just in the foothills of the mountains here, so there's maybe a bit more paranoia so close to the city when it comes to strangers traipsing across private land.

I realised from the archaeology.ie map that the 'tomb' is actually fairly close to some forestry and there's a car park in there not 400 metres from the site, so having given up on the Tibradden Lane eastern approach, I flew around to the Tibradden wood car-park.

About 200 metres south, in from the car-park you can walk though the thinned forestry and head north-west to the remains. The field here has been extensively quarried for gravel. I'm not sure that what I found is the tomb. It's listed as 'Megalithic tomb - Unclassified' on archaeology.ie and there are no more details. The only other online mention that I can find is the photo on the link that I posted. I've given this a wedge tomb classification given that Kilakee and Kilmashogue are close by, but I'm not confident that it's correct.

What does remain is overgrown and wrecked. There are some dressed stones and the most visible stones look like a capstone and a sidestone, part of some sort of chamber, though the capstone looks more like one from a portal tomb than a wedge tomb.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
10th February 2017ce

Tibradden (Wedge Tomb) — Links

Megalithics Monuments of Ireland


One photo of this wrecked monument.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
10th February 2017ce

Cromeleque do Portela de Mogos (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Cromeleque do Portela de Mogos</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
10th February 2017ce

Cromeleque do Vale Maria do Maio (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Cromeleque do Vale Maria do Maio</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Cromeleque do Vale Maria do Maio</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Cromeleque do Vale Maria do Maio</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
10th February 2017ce

Cromeleque do Portela de Mogos (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Cromeleque do Portela de Mogos</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
10th February 2017ce

Cluseburn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

From the A92 head north west on the B967, the Arbuthnott road, Lewis Grassic Gibbon country. Opposite Allardice take the road heading north past Millplough Farm (also past the remains of a RSC, cairn and standing stone), then take the next road heading north west past Craighead and keep going until the road ends at Cluseburn Farm. After being almost blown into the North Sea and frozen at Bervie, Cluseburn proved to be slightly sheltered from the storm. Permission was given to park and up the hill I went.

NO82007628
This is the best preserved of the cairns and sits at the top of the hill in the field to the north east. It sits at 14m and is 1m high. The turf covered site has had a 'fair houking' but still looks impressive despite the damage caused by cattle to the south western side.

NO81897628
This site is down the hill from 8200 and is the second best site here. It is almost 14m wide and is 0.6m tall. An upright stone maybe the remains of a cist according to Canmore.

NO82027626
All that is left of a once massive cairn is a bank or rim that would have well over 15m wide is a circular rim that doesn't reach more than 0.3m in height. It is only a few metres east of the best preserved cairn.

NO81807620
The smallest of the cairns is also the site nearest the farm and didn't receive any mercy from the 'houkers'. It is 6m wide and 0.5 tall. The enclosure shaped site nearby which has confused historians is simply a place were the farmer puts his cattle feeders.

To be fair, the farmer at Cluseburn has tried to protect the cairns on his land. His cattle have had different ideas and always knocked down the fences. During summer the cattle like to laze in the best preserved cairn to soak up (unlikely to be soaking up, being soaked is more likely|) the sun. He also explained about the nearby sites at Millplough, Montgoldrum and Cot Hillock.

Lovely site, freezing day :-)

Visited 24/1/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th February 2017ce

Craigenet (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

For this visit I walked north east on a track up Bogenchapel Hill going thru two sets of large new deer gates. From the second gate head north east skirting the flanks of Garnet Hill until a junction with a track leading south east. Split the corner and go straight east, uphill.

With snow coming down every site has a different atmosphere and this place is no exception. I love the snow so an added bonus for me. Another bonus is that the snow shows up the old cairn better revealing that it is at least 8m probably nearer 10m wide and 1m tall.

The views are once again stunning. From here I could see Pittenderich, Pressendye, Morven, Kerloch, Clachmaben, various Cairngorms etc all getting heavy snow thanks to the fact I couldn't see them.

With that in mind and the fact that I live north of here it was time to head back down, this time on the northern side of Garnet Hill which eventually leads back to Sundayswells.

Re-visited 9/2/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th February 2017ce

Craigenet (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Craigenet</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craigenet</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craigenet</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craigenet</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th February 2017ce

Nutgrove (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Nutgrove</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce

Nutgrove (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Miscellaneous

A Gallaun near Ballindangan, Co. Cork.
(By Courtenay Moore, Canon, M.A., Council Member C.H. and A.S.)

"Some months ago, a Corporal Oscroft of the Royal Engineers, who was engaged in this district, told me of the existence of the Gallaun. I went out on Saturday, July the 16th, to find it out. Stopping at the level-crossing of Ballindangan, on the Mitchelstown and Fermoy Railway, I asked an old woman at the gate-house about it; but whether it was owing to her deafness or ignorance, she could give me no information. However, help was at hand, a bright, intelligent girl, just entered on her 'teens, who overheard the conversation, and who answered to the name of Mary Kate, came forward and said she knew the stone and the way to it. Under her guidance I started off, and in about seven minutes we reached the place.

The Gallaun is a remarkable one, standing by itself in a field near the railway line. It is a monolith, ten feet nine inches in height, and five feet in superficial breadth; it is greatly scored and fissured, doubtless by the atmospheric influences and ice-action, but I could not see any human inscription on it of any kind. There is a small elder tree growing out of a cavity near the top.

The Gallaun is out of the perpendicular, probably owing to some yielding of the earth at the base, and inclines at an angle, roughly speaking, of some 12 or 20 degrees. It would be a great pity if this inclination increased, and that the stone should eventually fall.

On returning to the gate-lodge at the level crossing, I made some further enquiries, and by this time Mary Kate, my guide, was recognised by all and sundry as the proper authority. She said the Gallaun was in the town of Kilnadrow, "Spill it for him, Mary Kate, spill it for the gintleman," said her grandmother. Mary Kate accordingly "spilt it."

[...] The thickness of the stone is about one foot six inches. How much of it is under ground I have no definite idea; judging from the inclination, there is probably not very much. An old woman, who lives in the locality, informed me that a number of years ago, a man was ploughing up the field in which the Gallaun stands. The plough struck against a large flat stone, which he raised, and found under it an earthen urn containing some human bones. He replaced the urn, covered it up, and it has never been disturbed nor re-discovered since. At all events, the existence of the Ballindangan Gallaun is worth recording as a remarkable specimen of its class of pre-historic antiquities.
In Historical and Topographical Notes etc...' collected by J G White (1905).

I love that these sound just like TMA fieldnotes, with chatty remarks about the difficulties of finding the stone, and the quirks of the people met in the process.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce

Killian (Bullaun Stone) — Folklore

The "Wart Stone," or "Font," appears on the Ordnance Survey Map, No. 26, as "Doughnambraher Font." Thinking it very unlikely that there should be a font without a church, I came to the conclusion that there might be a bullaun at the spot marked. It is about three-quarters of a mile from Drummeen, or Barrycarroll Castle, and there is a sort of road all the way to it. We turned aside to visit the Castle, and so had to cross the fields to get to the bullaun.

We made inquiries once or twice from the inhabitants, and found out that the name of the place was Kyleane (three syllables), Killian on map; and that there was a stone there which would cure warts.

When we reached the place they pointed out, we soon found a large bullaun, of which I send a sketch. My friends thought it lay in a sort of fort, or enclosure, but I am not so sure. It is a large, flat sandstone, with one large basin in it, and something which looks like the beginning of a second. There are nine round stones in it which make part of the charm against warts: I suppose to turn them round like the Killeany stones.

We measured it as carefully as we could. The length of the stone is about 5 feet 7 inches, the width 3 feet 4 inches, while the basin is 1 foot 8 inches long, and 1 foot 3 inches wide. [...]
Miss G C Stacpoole reports in the 1904 volume of the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland.
The information via the Historic Environment Viewer describes the bullaun and its stones. It says the stone is also known locally as 'Jack Baker's Well' and is made of Old Red Sandstone. It contains 'seven water-rolled 'cursing' stones'. Situated in the basin of a ballaun stone lying in the perimeter of an ecclesiastical enclosure. Seven 'fist-sized' egg-shaped water-rolled stones lie in the basin which is sometimes waterfilled and associated with the cure of warts. There were previously ten stones although the number seems to vary up and down over time. Stacpoole includes nine stones in his [her!] drawing. 'Rounds' performed here involved rubbing each stone against the afflicted part of the body and placing an offering of some sort under the bullaun. In February 1993 this practice continued. While stones of this type are generally classified as cursing stones there is no known evidence of their use for that purpose in this instance.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce

Killian (Bullaun Stone) — Images

<b>Killian</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce
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