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Hafodygors Wen (Ring Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Hafodygors Wen</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Hafodygors Wen Cairn II (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Hafodygors Wen Cairn II</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Pen Llithrig y Wrach (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Pen Llithrig y Wrach</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Pen-y-Gaer (Caerhun) (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Pen-y-Gaer (Caerhun)</b>Posted by postman<b>Pen-y-Gaer (Caerhun)</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Waen Bryn-Gwenith (stone II) (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone II)</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Waen Bryn-Gwenith (stone I) (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone I)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone I)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone I)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone I)</b>Posted by postman<b>Waen Bryn-Gwenith  (stone I)</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Cae Du (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman<b>Cae Du</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
21st June 2017ce

Garth Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 21.6.2017

Three years later I find myself back on Garth Hill. This time however I am here on the Solstice to see the sun come up and not go down - minus Dafydd who I left in bed as he has school later this morning and he is one crabby boy when tired!

I arrived at the usual parking spot at 4.15am ready for a sunrise at 4.55am. I headed up the rough track and was soon joined by an elderly chap who informed me that his granddaughter was at Stonehenge so he thought he would join her in spirit by watching the Solstice from somewhere nearer home. I said I would rather be here than Stonehenge today!

Upon reaching the barrow we surveyed the scene around us. Although the sky above us was clear, it was hazy with some cloud on the horizon. Why is it that when you hope for a clear sky to see the sun rise/set it is usually like this? On the plus side we were treated to a crescent moon and the planet Venus shining brightly above it. It was a bit windy but cool rather than cold - no doubt it will get a lot warmer as the day unfolds during this current heat wave.

We were soon joined by 3 other people and then a little later by a lady walking her dog. By now the sky and surrounding countryside was starting to lighten, changing from blue to purple to lilac. The clouds being under lit by the still unseen sun changing the clouds from rose pink to bright orange and eventually to bright white. Several jet airliners sped high overhead, leaving a trail of white in their wake.

At 5.00am the sun made its brilliant appearance, breaking through the clouds as a bright red orb - a wondrous sight and well worth getting up for. All was quiet except for the sound of birdsong all around us. We were all deep in our own thoughts contemplating everything and nothing.

Before long the sun had risen sufficiently enough to make looking directly at it impossible. Time to head back down the hill, home, breakfast and get ready for work. I may be the most tired one in the office today but I will probably be the one feeling most fulfilled.
Posted by CARL
21st June 2017ce

Cairns O' The Bu (Broch) — Images

<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Ravenfeather<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Ravenfeather<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Ravenfeather<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Ravenfeather<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Ravenfeather Ravenfeather Posted by Ravenfeather
21st June 2017ce

Cairns O' The Bu (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited 20th June 2017

As the dig season for the Cairns draws towards its end, and the sun makes an appearance through the clouds, it seems like the right time for a trip down to South Ronaldsay to check out the excavation. There is a small parking spot down at Windwick bay, full when we arrived, so we squeezed the car onto the verge, please make sure you don’t block the drive of the neighbouring house though, fortunately we didn’t, but during our visit someone else had, prompting a visit from the irate householder unable to get his car out, giving a bit of a haranguing to the archaeologists!

Soon we were approached by a friendly archaeologist asking us if we would like a tour, and along with a small group of other visitors he proceeded to take us all around the site giving us a fascinating explanation of the various features, before taking us into the finds hut to show us some of the most recent finds, including a lovely bronze ‘Hand-pin’ found a few days ago.

Even without a tour though the site would be well worth a visit. The first thing that struck me was the size of the broch, walls at least three metres thick, with the fine sweep of its circular stonework and its interior orthostats clearly showing dividing partitions within the structure. Just seeing it partially emerged from the ground, and coming back into view for the first time in over 1,500 years was amazing. I was particularly struck by the holed stone orthostat which stood aligned with main broch entrance, the archaeologist suggesting it may have been a stone taken from an earlier neolithic monument from the surrounding area and re-used.

Outside of the broch work was proceeding on the large trench investigating the surrounding village complex. Two furnaces and a number of parts of broken moulds for bronze pins have been uncovered in this area, suggesting production of jewellery on a large scale, and suggestive of an obviously important site.

We learned so much about this fascinating place, particularly intriguing to me was the fact that apparently the broch had at one point been de-commissioned, the upper floors taken down, and used to infill the interior of the structure, but done in a careful way without destroying the internal partitions. Even more mysteriously a souterrain was then built outside of the structure which linked to a chamber built into the infilled broch.

We must have spent at least an hour with the archaeologist, who gave us a fantastic tour of this enigmatic site, and if you ever get the chance to visit during the Cairns relatively short excavation season I can’t recommend it highly enough.
Ravenfeather Posted by Ravenfeather
21st June 2017ce

Disa's Ting (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Disa's Ting</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Disa's Ting</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Disa's Ting</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Disa's Ting</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Disa's Ting</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
20th June 2017ce

Cairns O' The Bu (Broch) — News

The Cairns Blog


https://archaeologyorkney.com/category/the-cairns-dig-diary-2017/
Posted by Lianachan
19th June 2017ce

Cairns O' The Bu (Broch) — Images

<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Lianachan<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Lianachan<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Lianachan<b>Cairns O' The Bu</b>Posted by Lianachan Posted by Lianachan
19th June 2017ce

Dun Deardail (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun Deardail</b>Posted by Lianachan Posted by Lianachan
19th June 2017ce

The Standing Stones of Stenness (Stone Circle) — Folklore

Tales From Eynhallow by Thelma Nicol

STANDING STONES

Mammy! Mammy!” Whut wey did that big stones git there?” Peedie Davo tugged at his mother’s sleeve. His mother was tired of Davo’s never ending questions about the great pieces of stone that formed the familiar landscape by the Loch of Stenness she promised, that if he was good she would tell him at bedtime, hoping that by that time he would have forgotten. She had not reckoned with peedie Davo’s determination to get an answer to his question.

“You promised Mammy,” he whispered as she tucked him up in bed. “Whut wey did they git there?” His mother shook her head and sat down wearily on the stool by his bedside. “Weel,” she began, “hid wis a long time ago and I canna mind the rights o’ hid bit hid wis afore the Norsemen cam tae Orkney, so they must be thoosands o’ years ould.”

“Oulder than Grandad?” Davo enquired, looking across the lobby where his Grandfather drowsed by the fire in the kitchen.

“Oh yass, far oulder than Grandad. There wisna many folk bade in Orkney at the time. All the folk lived doon sooth thoo see’s. They say that t he standing stones reach doon intae the grund twice as far as they stand abune hid .”

“Whut wey did they git doon there then I winder?” Peedie Davo’s enquiry into the origin of the Standing Stones of Stenness was proving to be more of a problem than his mother had ever imagined.

“Well,” she struggled on, “shut thee eyes like a good boy noo, and I’ll tell thee.” With fingers crossed that he would soon fall asleep she began. “Hid wis a midsummer’s night . The day hid been hot an quiet, not the usual breezy kind o’ wither that we usually hiv in June. The sky wis somet imes owercast and a rumble o’ thunder cam fae the direction o’ Hoy. There wis great flashes o’ lightning. A’ the birds wir quiet and the twa three folk that lived aboot hands wir huddled taegither. The bairns were a sleepan snug and warm under thir sealskin blankets.”

Peedie Davo’s mother paused and glanced hopefully at her small son. “Did the thunder come again Mammy?” he asked.?

“Oh yass,” she answered. “More thunder and rain like they have niver seen the like o’ afore or since. Suddenly there wis a great flash o’ lightning and the grund roond aboot Stenness wis thrown up like hid wis an earthquake. Some o’ the big stones landed upright and the grund fell back and filled up the holes except whar the Loch is noo. It filled up wae the rain water and so there’s been a loch there ever since and nobody’s ever bothered tae shift the stones so they are still there too. The twa three folk that hid lived in Stenness at that time wir thrown up in the air bit they landed in Stromness and decided to stay there. And that‘s the weyt here’s more folk in Stromness than in Stenness.”

There was a gentle snore from the bed and a sigh from peedie Davo’s mother as she whispered: “Whit a lot o’ lees thee mither tells thee Davo. Bit the truth is she disno ken whut wey the stones cam tae be there and nither dis anybody else. Goodnight Davo!”
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
19th June 2017ce

Scotland (Country) — News

History in the hills: on the trail of Scotland's prehistoric rock carvings


Article on The Guardian online travel page today...

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/jun/19/scotland-prehistoric-rock-carvings-walking-holidays?CMP=twt_gu
1speed Posted by 1speed
19th June 2017ce

Ringses Camp, Beanley Moor (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

What a weird site.

I first saw this set of earthworks (I'm not happy calling it a 'fort', 'camp' is also a bit iffy tbh...) almost 30 years ago, but then just in the distance as I was wandering about exploring the area around a small festival at one of the farms at the edge of the moor.

Since then I've looked at it in the distance a few times, and on aerial shots, it's quite easily visible, and merits some seriously confident dashes on the OS map, so I knew the ramparts were fairly high.

But actually having a walk about in there for the first time, I was surprised by how small it is in footprint. There's barely enough room for a house, though apparently there was one during a Romano-British re-occupation period of use. I couldn't quite shake the feeling that it might have also been re-used more recently, mebbe during the border reiver years.

So the overall effect is quite impressive. Because the ramparts are 4m high in places, so it's got an almost claustrophobic feel to it.

Oddly small 'fort'. Lotsa Bronze age stuff nearby. Access isn't too tricky if you go when the bracken is low. Bloody annoying round this neck of the woods if it's high. Go have a look if you're in the area.
Hob Posted by Hob
19th June 2017ce

Dun Dornadilla (Broch) — Images

<b>Dun Dornadilla</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th June 2017ce

Dun Dornadilla (Broch) — Folklore

Dun Dornghil, erroneously called Dornadilla, is represented at the termination of this Chapter. It was, in the memory of man, about thirty feet high, but is now much dilapidated. Not a stone of this fabric "is moulded by a hammer, nor is there any fog or other material used to fill up the interstices among the stone; yet the stones are most artfully laid together, seem to exclude the air, and have been piled with great mathematical exactness."
The following verse concerning it, is repeated by the inhabitants.
Dun Dornghil Mac Duiff
Or an taobh ri meira don strha
Scheht mille o manir
Er an rod a racha na fir do Gholen.


Translation.
The Dun of Dornghiall, son of Duff,
Built on the side of the strath next to Rea,
Seven miles from the ocean,
And in the way by which the warriors travel to Caithness.*

* Rev. A. Pope, in Archaeologia, v.
From 'The Scottish Gael; or, Celtic manners, as preserved among the Highlanders' by James Logan (first published 1831).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th June 2017ce
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